Agreement on the Prohibition of Attack against Nuclear Installations

For Prelims and Hands: The agreement, its meaning and necessity. India also expressed its “grave concern” to Pakistan`s High Commission in New Delhi over the “repeated cases” of atrocities against members of the minority community – a sign of the underlying tensions between the two countries. “We expect the Pakistani government to investigate the case and take strict action against those responsible for this vandalism and the demolition of a temple in Karak district, Khyber Pakhtunkhwa province,” said a person familiar with the matter. The bilateral agreement – the first of its kind between the two South Asian neighbours – was signed on 31 December 1988, before one of them openly broke up as a nuclear power. It entered into force on 1 January 1991. India and Pakistan both became nuclear powers in May 1998, when India conducted five armed nuclear tests and Pakistan six. The first exchange of schedules under the 1988 Agreement took place in 1992. The treaty prohibited its signatories from carrying out a surprise attack (or aiding foreign powers to attack) against their respective nuclear facilities and facilities. The treaty provides a confidence-building environment for security measures and prevents any party from “taking, promoting or participating, directly or indirectly, in any action aimed at destroying or damaging a nuclear facility or facility in any country.” [1] Since January 1992, India and Pakistan have exchanged annual lists of their respective military and civilian nuclear facilities. [2] The Indo-Pakistan Non-Aggression Agreement is a unique bilateral agreement that in a way extends the scope of Articles 56 and 15 of the First and Second Protocols to the Geneva Convention.

These articles stipulate that structures or installations containing dangerous forces, namely dams and nuclear power plants, shall not be attacked, even if such objects are military targets, if such an attack may result in the release of dangerous forces and the resulting heavy losses among the civilian population. India and Pakistan have exchanged lists of nuclear facilities and facilities covered by an agreement to prohibit attacks on nuclear facilities and facilities between the two countries through diplomatic channels simultaneously in New Delhi and Islamabad since January 1992, India and Pakistan have exchanged lists of their respective nuclear-related civilian facilities. However, each page questioned the completeness of the list of others. Topics covered: India and its neighbourly relations. Bilateral, regional and global groupings and agreements to which India is a party and/or which affect India`s interests. The agreement requires that India and Pakistan not take, promote or participate in any action aimed at destroying or damaging nuclear facilities or facilities in any country. Background: India and Pakistan have exchanged their list of nuclear facilities. The exchange was in line with the Agreement on the Prohibition of Attacks on Nuclear Facilities between Pakistan and India. The Agreement on Non-Nuclear Aggression is a bilateral nuclear arms control treaty between the two South Asian States of India and Pakistan on the reduction (or limitation) of nuclear weapons and undertakes not to attack foreign Powers or to assist them in attacking their respective nuclear installations and installations. [1] The treaty was drafted in 1988 and signed on December 21, 1988 by Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto and his Indian counterpart Rajiv Gandhi.

it entered into force in January 1991. [1] It states that “the list of nuclear facilities and facilities in Pakistan was officially handed over to a representative of the Indian High Commission at the Ministry of External Affairs today at 1100 a.m. (PST)”. “The Indian Ministry of Foreign Affairs in New Delhi has handed over the list of Indian nuclear facilities and facilities to a representative of the High Commission of Pakistan at 1130 a.m. (IST),” she added. Pakistan and India on Friday adopted the annual practice of exchanging the list of their nuclear facilities under a bilateral agreement prohibiting them from attacking each other`s nuclear facilities. On the Convention on the Prohibition of Attacks on Nuclear Installations: The Agreement defines nuclear installations or installations against which an attack is prohibited as “nuclear energy and research reactors, fuel production, uranium enrichment, isotope separation and reprocessing plants, and any other facility containing fresh or irradiated nuclear fuel and material in any form it is facilities where significant quantities of radioactive material are stored.” The relationship collapsed after Indian warplanes bombed a terrorist training camp deep in Pakistan on February 26, 2019, in response to the Pulwama terror attack by the Pakistan-based Jaish-e-Mohammed terrorist group, which killed 40 CRPF jawans. After the 1988 general election, Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto invited Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi.

[4] On the 21st. In December 1988, Indian Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi paid a state visit to Pakistan and met with Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto in Islamabad. [4] Further discussions concluded the negotiations in Islamabad on December 21, 1988, when Prime Minister Benazir Bhutto and Prime Minister Rajiv Gandhi signed the Agreement on Non-Nuclear Attacks. The treaty was ratified by the parliaments of India and Pakistan and ratified on 27 January 1991. [1] The first list of nuclear facilities in India and Pakistan was exchanged between two countries on 1 January 1992. [5] [6] The exchange takes place annually on January 1 under the Convention on the Prohibition of Attacks on Nuclear Facilities and Installations, also known as the Agreement on Non-Nuclear Aggression. Last week, on New Year`s Day on Wednesday, India and Pakistan celebrated their 29th anniversaries. annual exchange of lists of sensitive nuclear installations successively in accordance with a successful non-aggression agreement between them. According to the agreement on the prohibition of attacks on nuclear facilities, lists are understood by each country as a taboo for attacks during a conflict. The agreement does not contain any specific compliance and verification measures beyond the exchange of lists by the two countries.

The precise criteria for what may be included and excluded in these lists are not fixed; It is generally assumed that the list of nuclear-related facilities is unlikely to be exhaustive, as New Delhi and Islamabad offer incentives to hide certain facilities relevant to their respective nuclear weapons programmes. The Agreement, which was signed on 31 December 1988 and signed on 27 December 1988. Having entered into force in January 1991, the two countries will inform each other on the first of January of each calendar year of the nuclear installations and installations to be covered by the Pact. The exchange of lists is the 29th in a row between the two nuclear-armed neighbors. The agreement stipulates that it will refrain from taking, promoting or participating, directly or indirectly, in any action aimed at destroying or damaging a nuclear installation or installation in any country. It describes a nuclear facility or facility and requires each Party to notify the other Party no later than January 1 of each calendar year and each time the exact locations (latitude and longitude) of the facilities and facilities change. The agreement does not provide for detailed disclosure of nuclear-related activities. The exchange was carried out in accordance with Article II of the December 1988 signed an agreement on the prohibition of attacks on nuclear facilities and facilities between Pakistan and India, the Federal Foreign Office (FO) said in a statement. India has repeatedly proposed extending the agreement to non-attacks against civilian and economic targets, but Pakistan has consistently rejected these proposals. However, India`s latest draft nuclear doctrine includes a deterrent capability based on unacceptable harm to an adversary; Therefore, the likelihood of extending the agreement to peer (non-military) targets may now be low.

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